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Teaching Yeast to Age Part II

In my last post I explained how to get a bag of 4 yeast spores of which one hopefully has the two mutations I want in my new yeast strain. Now comes the really tricky part: You have to find this spore.

Yeast cells under 1000x magnification (DIC), own work

Before I explain the method you have to get an idea on how small one yeast cell is. The average yeast cell is about 3 to 4 micrometers. The smallest distance between two dots to still see them as two with the naked eye is 0.1 mm which is about 300 times a yeast cell. A human hair is on average between 0.06 an 0.08 mm thick, which is 20 times a yeast cell. If you look at the picture above, depicting yeast cells magnified 1000x, the whole frame is about the thickness of a hair.

OK, so they are really small and not visible with the naked eye but we want to find a single spore (that is again smaller than a normal cell) and identify it. The method we use for that is called micromanipulation. A micromanipulator is basically a microscope with a stage (on which you fix the plate with your cells) that can be moved in tiny increments. And it has a lever with a very thin glas needle fixed to it that through some mechanics can also be moved in a very small scale.

My lab has quite a cool and modern micromipulator that has a joystick to move the stage and a computer driving you to positions on a virtual grid on your plate where you can put single cells.
What you now do is you look through a patch on your plate where you’ve put some of your cells. Once you’ve found a bag with 4 spores (which is called a Tetrad) you move the tiny needle really close to it. A moment before the needle would actually touch the plate a meniscus of water forms between the needle tip and the plate that scoops up the Tetrad and hopefully nothing else. Then you move to an empty position on the grid and, by moving and shaking the needle while it almost touches the surface, you try to deposit one of those 4 spores. Then you go to the next spot and do that again. So in the end you get a plate full of 4 spots in a row where you deposited single spores. You can see how it works in the following video.

Me showing how a Tetrad dissection works.

After finishing the sorting I put the plate to 30 °C for one or two days to give the cells time to grow. The result looks like this:

Dissection plate with colonies on it, own work

As you see not all cells I’ve laid out have grown. That is quite normal because not all spores are viable after the procedure. On the left side was the reservoir, where I’ve put a lot of cells to look for Tetrads. I’ve cut that off with a clean scalpel so the cells do not overgrow the rest of the plate.

In the next step now I have to identify which of these cells are really derived from spores (and are haploid) and which of them are actually just normal diploid cells that accidentally lay around with 3 buddies and looked like Tetrads. To do this you use another nice feature of yeast. Wild yeast can live of a lt of things and can make everything it needs (like amino-acids and bases for DNA) semselves. The labstrains you normally use however have some genes they need for this knocked-out. This means to let them grow you need to add some amino-acids and other things to the medium. Now the trick is, that the genetic traits that I want to breed together here are marked with the genetic code that the laboratory strain needs to make these amio-acids themselves. That means I take this plate and stamp it over to a plate where the medium is missing two special amino-acids, only those cells can grow that have both genetic traits that I need. This is called selection.

The problem here is that the diploid cells I mistook for Tetrads also have both markers and can also grow. Here however the statistic can help. Since I always put all 4 cells that were together in one row and in a Tetrad only one of those 4 can have both of the genetic markers, I now have to check my selection plate for rows where only one of the 4 cells has grown. Another test that I can do afterwards is to see if the cells of such a colony mate with other haploid cells of either mating type. Diploid cells won’t do that.

Original plate on the right, selection plate on the left, own work

The results look relatively promising but further analysis showed that this actually hasn’t worked. However this is an important part of science: Things don’t work. After trying this a couple of times I decided to first try another way to teach my yeast cells to age that is a bit more elegant and hopefully works better: I will put a switch on the gene for Telomerase so I can turn it on and off as I want. I’ll explain how this works the next time.

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